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A total lunar eclipse will occur later this week, as people around the world will be able to see the Moon in the Earth’s shadow.

The lunar eclipse will be visible in South America, North America and parts of Europe and Africa. In the UK, we will be able to see the Moon turn red during a lunar eclipse.

The last total lunar eclipse in the UK – which also occurred during the first full moon of the year – took place in January 2019, meaning total lunar eclipses don’t happen very often.

Therefore, anyone interested in space or astronomy should make the most of the opportunity to see the lunar eclipse this weekend.

Learn everything you need to know about the lunar eclipse below.

What is a lunar eclipse?

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth is directly between the Sun and the Moon, with the Moon in the Earth’s shadow. The Moon will pass through the darkest part of the Earth’s shadow, which is called the umbra.

A total lunar eclipse can only occur when the Earth, Sun and Moon are in a straight line.

During a lunar eclipse, the Moon will turn dark red. This happens because “it is illuminated by light that has passed through the Earth’s atmosphere and has been bent back to the Moon by refraction,” according to Royal Observatory.

The lunar eclipse is often called the “Blood Moon” because of its red color. The color of the Moon will depend on the global state of dust in the atmosphere.

A total lunar eclipse occurs at least twice every three years.

What is the difference between lunar eclipse and solar eclipse?

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon is in the Earth’s shadow.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon moves directly between the Sun and the Earth, so that the Earth is in the shadow of the moon.

How to watch the lunar eclipse in May 2022

A lunar eclipse will take place this weekend, on the night of May 15-16.

In the UK, the Moon will begin to enter Earth’s shadow just after 2:30am. A total lunar eclipse will take place just before 4:30 a.m.

We’ll be able to watch the eclipse from around 2:30 a.m. until 5:10 a.m., when the Moon will dip below the horizon.

In London, the Royal Observatory said the optimal viewing time would be between 4.29am and 5:06am when the Moon is in complete darkness of the Earth and will appear red.

If you can’t see the eclipse with your own eyes or if your view is blocked by clouds, you’ll be able to watch the eclipse on live streams.

NASA will go live lunar eclipse on YouTube, starting at 2:30am UK time, while Griffith . Observatory in Los Angeles will also host a YouTube live stream.

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